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BARACLUDE 0.5 MG TABLET

Tablet
MRP: Rs. 745.50 for 1 strip(s) (10 tablet each)
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Composition for BARACLUDE

Entecavir(0.5 mg)

food interaction for BARACLUDE

alcohol interaction for BARACLUDE

pregnancy interaction for BARACLUDE

lactation interaction for BARACLUDE

food
alcohol
pregnancy
lactation
It is better to take Baraclude 0.5 mg tablet empty stomach (1 hour before food or 2 hours after food).
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Baraclude 0.5 mg tablet may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
WEIGH RISKS VS. BENEFITS
Unknown. Human and animal studies are not available. Please consult your doctor.

SALT INFORMATION for BARACLUDE

Entecavir(0.5 mg)

Uses

Baraclude 0.5 mg tablet is used in the treatment of HIV infection, Chronic hepatitis B

How it works

Baraclude 0.5 mg tablet is an antiviral drug and belongs to class of drugs called synthetic nucleoside analogues. It works by blocking the DNA synthesis in hepatitis B virus, a process essential for the virus to grow and multiply. Baraclude 0.5 mg tablet thus stops the virus from spreading in the body. It does not prevent spread of HBV infections to other people.

Common side effects

Nausea, Rash, Allergic reaction, Dizziness, Hair loss, Headache, Indigestion, Vomiting, Fatigue, Worsening of hepatitis b (viral infection of liver), Lactic acidosis

Common Dosage for BARACLUDE 0.5 MG TABLET

Patients taking BARACLUDE 0.5 MG TABLET

  • 92%
    Once A Day
  • 3%
    Twice A Day
  • 2%
    Twice A Week
  • 2%
    Alternate Day
  • 2%
    Thrice A week

SUBSTITUTES for BARACLUDE

10 Substitutes
Sorted By
RelevancePrice
  • ENTEHEP 0.5 MG TABLET
    (10 tablets in strip)
    Zydus Cadila
    Rs. 72.97/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 729.67
    save 2% more per tablet
  • ENTAVIR 0.5 MG TABLET
    (10 tablets in strip)
    Cipla Ltd
    Rs. 74.55/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 745.50
    same price
  • ENTALIV -0.5 TABLET
    (30 tablets in strip)
    Dr Reddy's Laboratories Ltd
    Rs. 74.55/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 2236.50
    same price
  • X VIR 0.5 MG TABLET
    (30 tablets in strip)
    Natco Pharma Ltd
    Rs. 82/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 2460
    pay 10% more per tablet
  • HEPALO 0.5MG TABLET
    (10 tablets in strip)
    Emcure Pharmaceuticals Ltd
    Rs. 75/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 750
    pay 1% more per tablet

Top Physicians

  • Dr. M. K. Singh
    MBBS, MD
    4.8
  • Dr. Prabhat Kumar Jha
    MBBS, MD
    4.7
  • Dr. Ashutosh Shukla
    MBBS, MD, Diploma, Fellowship
    4.6
  • Dr. Joy Chakraborty
    MBBS, MD
    4.5
  • Dr. P. R. Aryan
    MBBS, Diploma
    4.3

Expert advice for BARACLUDE

  • Do not discontinue taking entecavir without your doctor’s advice.
  • Entecavir should be taken on an empty stomach. Please follow the instructions of your doctor.
  • Do consult your doctor before taking entecavir, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant.
  • Do consult your doctor before taking entecavir, if you are breast-feeding.
  • Do not drive or operate machines if you feed dizzy, tired or sleepy after taking entecavir.
  • Do consult your doctor before taking entecavir if you have Kidney disease, any other liver disease or a liver transplant.
  • Consult your doctor before taking entecavir, if you have AIDS or HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection. Tests for HIV should be performed before taking entecavir in suspected individuals.
  • Inform your doctor, if you have taken medicines containing active drug lamivudine (Epivir, Epzicom, Trizivir) or telbivudine. Inform your doctor about all medications you have received in the past for treatment of hepatitis B.
  • Worsening of hepatitis B may occur while taking entecavir and upon discontinuation. Liver function tests must be conducted while on treatment and upon discontinuation.
  • Immediately report symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and stomach pain to your doctor. These might indicate development of a life-threatening side effect of entecavir called lactic acidosis (excess lactic acid in blood). Lactic acidosis occurs more often in women, particularly if they are very overweight.

Frequently asked questions for BARACLUDE

Entecavir

Q.What is entecavir/baraclude used for?
Baraclude is a trade name for active drug entecavir. Entecavir is an antiviral drug and is used to treat long-term infection of the liver (hepatitis) caused by hepatitis B virus

Q.What is entecavir monohydrate?
Entecavir monohydrate is the salt form of active drug entecavir which is used in the preparation of different formulations (eg. Tablets). It has the same antiviral activity like entecavir and is used to treat long-term infection of the liver (hepatitis) caused by hepatitis B virus

Q.Is entecavir/baraclude effective?
Baraclude is a trade name for active drug entecavir and is used to treat long-term infection of the liver (hepatitis) caused by hepatitis B virus. It is effective if used as advised by your doctor. The effectiveness of entecavir may vary depending upon individual cases

Q.What are the side effects of baraclude?
Baraclude is a trade name for active drug entecavir and has the same side effects as entecavir

Q.How does baraclude work?
Baraclude is a trade name for active drug entecavir. Entecavir is an antiviral drug and works by blocking the DNA synthesis in hepatitis B virus, a process essential for the virus to grow and multiply. It stops the virus from spreading in the body

Q.Does entecavir work/how fast does entecavir work?
Entecavir is an antiviral drug used to treat long-term infection of the liver (hepatitis) caused by hepatitis B virus. It is effective if used as advised by your doctor. The effectiveness and duration of treatment may vary upon individual response

Q.Does entecavir affect sperm or cause weight gain?
No. Entecavir has no known effect on sperm or increasing body weight.

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Content on this page was last updated on 23 August, 2016, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)