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    Acyclovir

    Information about Acyclovir

    Acyclovir uses

    How acyclovir works

    Acyclovir is an antiviral medication. It prevents the multiplication of virus in human cells. This stops the virus from producing new viruses and clears up your infection.

    Common side effects of acyclovir

    Headache, Dizziness, Vomiting, Nausea, Fatigue, Fever, Increased liver enzymes, Stomach pain, Diarrhea, Skin rash, Injection site reaction
    Content Details
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    Written By
    Dr. Radhika Dua
    MDS (Oral Pathology & Microbiology), BDS
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    Reviewed By
    Dr. Shilpa Garcha
    MD (Pharmacology), MBBS
    Last updated on:
    18 Apr 2019 | 12:43 PM (IST)
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    Available Medicine for Acyclovir

    • ₹48 to ₹466
      Cipla Ltd
      8 variant(s)
    • ₹35 to ₹519
      Glaxo SmithKline Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      6 variant(s)
    • ₹33 to ₹212
      FDC Ltd
      9 variant(s)
    • ₹67 to ₹272
      Mankind Pharma Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹42 to ₹283
      Micro Labs Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹71 to ₹247
      Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹94 to ₹467
      Samarth Life Sciences Pvt Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹50 to ₹265
      East India Pharmaceutical Works Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹471 to ₹655
      Troikaa Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹361
      United Biotech Pvt Ltd
      1 variant(s)

    Frequently asked questions for Acyclovir

    Acyclovir

    Q. Will I get cured after taking Acyclovir for shingles?

    Acyclovir is an antiviral medicine effective against herpes simplex and varicella zoster viruses. It does not cure infections caused by these viruses but helps to minimize the symptoms and shorten the duration of infection. It does not remove the viruses from the body but prevents the viruses from dividing and spreading.

    Q. Does Acyclovir prevent transmission of infection to others?

    No, you can infect other people, even while you are being treated with Acyclovir. Herpes infections are contagious, so avoid letting infected areas come into contact with other people. Avoid touching your eyes after touching an infected area. Wash your hands frequently to prevent transmitting the infection to others. You should practice safe sex by using condoms. You should not have sex if you have genital sores or blisters.

    Q. What are the serious side effects of Acyclovir?

    Serious side effects are rare, but if you experience them, you should seek medical advice right away. These rare side effects include hives, blistering or peeling rash, yellow skin or eyes, unusual bruising or bleeding, loss of consciousness, fits, difficulty in breathing, hallucinations and swelling of the face, tongue, lips or throat.

    Q. Do elderly patients need to be more careful while taking Acyclovir?

    Older adults (over age 65 years) tend to experience more side effects when taking Acyclovir. The reason being, their kidneys do not flush the drug out of their system as quickly as a younger person’s kidneys would do. Elderly patients should drink plenty of water while taking Acyclovir, and their kidney function should be monitored. These patients should be given a lower dose and should be monitored for neurological problems.

    Q. What can happen if somebody takes more than the recommended dose of Acyclovir accidentally?

    Accidental, repeated overdoses of oral Acyclovir over several days have resulted in nausea, vomiting, confusion and headache. Consult your doctor in case of overdose.

    Q. Can I get resistant to Acyclovir treatment?

    Patients with advanced HIV disease or patients with an impaired immunity have reported resistance to Acyclovir. If you are not responding to Acyclovir, possibility of drug resistance should be checked.

    Q. Is hair loss caused due to Acyclovir permanent?

    Hair loss is an uncommon side effect of Acyclovir. It stops when the medicine is discontinued.

    Content on this page was last updated on 18 April, 2019, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)