1mg, best e pharmacy in India

ZEPDON 400 MG TABLET

Tablet
MRP: Rs. 9400 for 1 bottle(s) (60 tablets each)
1
Unfortunately, we don't have any more items in stock
Report Error

Composition for ZEPDON

Raltegravir(400 mg)

food interaction for ZEPDON

alcohol interaction for ZEPDON

pregnancy interaction for ZEPDON

lactation interaction for ZEPDON

food
alcohol
pregnancy
lactation
It can be taken with or without food, but it is better to take Zepdon 400 mg tablet at a fixed time.
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Zepdon 400 mg tablet may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
WEIGH RISKS VS. BENEFITS
Unknown. Human and animal studies are not available. Please consult your doctor.

SALT INFORMATION for ZEPDON

Raltegravir(400 mg)

Uses

Zepdon 400 mg tablet is used in the treatment of HIV infection.

How it works

Zepdon 400 mg tablet belongs to a class of HIV integrase inhibitors. It works by inhibiting the action of an enzyme called integrase which is essential for the multiplication and survival of the virus (viral replication), thereby reducing HIV causing virus in the body.

Common side effects

Nausea, Nightmare, Liver enzyme increased, Abdominal pain, Abdominal swelling, Abnormal behavior, Abnormal dreams, Abnormal white blood cells, Depression, Diarrhoea, Dizziness, Fever, Headache, Indigestion, Insomnia, Loss of appetite, Muscle weakness, Rash, Vertigo, Vomiting, Fatigue, Restlessness, Anxiety

SUBSTITUTES for ZEPDON

1 Substitutes
Sorted By
RelevancePrice
  • ISENTRESS 400 MG TABLET
    (60 tablets in bottle)
    MSD Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd
    Rs. 167.05/tablet
    Tablet
    Rs. 10023.30
    pay 7% more per tablet

Top Physicians

  • Dr. M. K. Singh
    MBBS, MD
    4.8
  • Dr. Ashutosh Shukla
    MBBS, MD, Diploma, Fellowship
    4.6
  • Dr. Joy Chakraborty
    MBBS, MD
    4.5
  • Dr. R. S. Rawat
    MBBS, MD
    4.5
  • Dr. P. R. Aryan
    MBBS, Diploma
    4.3

Expert advice for ZEPDON

  • Do consult your doctor before taking raltegravir if you have phenylketonuria (a serious hereditary disorder), a medical history of depression or any psychiatric illness, severe liver disorders or muscle disorders (myopathy or rhabdomyolysis).
  • Contact your doctor immediately if you notice stiffness, pain and difficulty in movement of joints or unexplained muscle pain, weakness and tenderness or notice signs of any infection such as fever while on treatment with raltegravir.
  • Avoid taking antacids containing aluminum or magnesium within 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take raltegravir.
  • Do not operate machines, drive or cycle if you feel dizzy after taking raltegravir.
  • Raltegravir does not prevent the spread of HIV virus to others through blood or sexual contact. Take the required precautions to prevent transmission.
  • Continue taking raltegravir even if you feel well, as skipping the medicine may worsen your condition and may lead to resistance to treatment.
  • You must be aware that your body fat may increase or move to different areas of your body such as your breasts and upper back while on raltegravir therapy.
  • Tell your doctor if you are or planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. You must receive proper treatment for HIV to avoid passing of the infection to your baby.

Frequently asked questions for ZEPDON

Raltegravir

Q.Is raltegravir a protease inhibitor?
No. Raltegravir is an anti HIV drug. It does not have any known inhibitory effect on enzyme protease

Q.What is Raltegravir used for?
Raltegravir is used for the treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

Q.How does raltegravir work?
How does raltegravir inhibit HIV viral replication?Raltegravir works by inhibiting the action of an enzyme called integrase which is essential for the multiplication and survival of the virus (viral replication), thereby reducing HIV causing virus in the body.

Articles


Content on this page was last updated on 14 April, 2015, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)