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Understanding the Test
Test Measures
Interpreting Results
FAQ's
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References
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Dr. Shreya Gupta
BDS, MDS - Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
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MBBS, MD (Pharmacology)
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Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA

Also known as IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase, IgA Anti-tTG, Celiac disease testing, Celiac disease antibody testing
9891100 10% Off
You need to provide
Blood
This test is for
Male, Female
Test Preparation
  1. No special preparation is required.

Understanding Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA


What is Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA?

A Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test helps to identify the presence of specific antibodies in the blood associated with celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by the ingestion of gluten-containing foods. It helps assess the immune response to gluten, helping in the assessment and management of celiac disease. 

Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is an enzyme that plays an important role in various biological processes. One of its key functions is to help in the formation of stable protein structures by catalyzing the binding of proteins. tTG enzyme is implicated in the immune response triggered by gluten (a protein found in cereals like wheat, barley, and rye and foods like cakes, bread, and pasta)  consumption.

In individuals with celiac disease, exposure to gluten often prompts an abnormal immune response where antibodies, including anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies, are produced. These antibodies target the tTG enzyme, causing characteristic damage to the lining of the small intestine. Untreated celiac disease can lead to potential complications like malabsorption, malnutrition, weakened bones (osteoporosis), fertility problems, or an increased risk of intestinal cancer. It may also increase the risk of developing other autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. 

A Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test helps in the diagnosis and timely management of celiac disease in individuals experiencing digestive problems, unexplained symptoms such as chronic diarrhea, bloating, stomach pain, etc. suggestive of celiac disease, or those with a family history of celiac disease or having risk factors such as diabetes, thyroid problems etc. 

No special preparation is required before undertaking the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test. However, to diagnose celiac disease, the test should be performed before eliminating gluten from the diet. 

Lab test results may vary across different laboratories. Abnormal test results require an expert interpretation, therefore, never try to self-medicate at home based solely on these results, and always consult a doctor for proper understanding of the test results. The insights from Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test are valuable in the pursuit of an accurate diagnosis and effective management of celiac disease.

What is Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA used for?

A Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test is done: 

  • To diagnose celiac disease by detecting antibodies related to gluten sensitivity.

  • To confirm if symptoms like digestive problems, fatigue, or skin problems are due to celiac disease.

  • As a part of screening for individuals with a family history of celiac disease or those experiencing unexplained symptoms.

  • To assess gluten sensitivity beyond celiac disease.

  • To guide dietary choices for individuals with gluten-related problems.

  • To monitor the treatment response in patients with celiac disease.

  • To monitor the effectiveness of a gluten-free diet in individuals with celiac disease.

  • As a part of the diagnostic process for autoimmune disorders associated with gluten sensitivity.

What does Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA measure?

A Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test measures the presence of specific antibodies in the blood. These antibodies, specifically immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies, are produced in response to the tissue transglutaminase(tTG) enzyme which is involved in the body’s reaction to gluten.

Elevated levels of tTG IgA antibodies in the blood indicate an immune response to gluten, helping doctors confirm the presence of celiac disease or assess gluten sensitivity. A Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test provides important information for the diagnosis and management of conditions associated with gluten-related disorders.

Interpreting Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA results


Interpretations

 

Result (In Units)

Interpretation

<20

Negative

20-30

Weak Positive

>30

Positive

 

Reference range may vary from lab to lab*

  • A positive anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody IgA test usually indicates celiac disease 

  • A negative test usually means that symptoms are not likely due to celiac disease. If the person being tested has not consumed any gluten for several weeks or months prior to the test, then the test may show false-negative results 

  • All antibody tests for celiac disease are usually followed by an intestinal biopsy which is the gold standard for diagnosis of this condition 

 

 

Answers to Patient Concerns & Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA


Frequently Asked Questions about Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA

Q. When should I consider getting a Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test?

You should consider a Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test if you are experiencing symptoms suggestive of celiac disease. It is also useful for assessing the effectiveness of a gluten-free diet.

Q. Is there any risk associated with the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test?

No, the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test is generally a safe procedure. While rare, bruising, bleeding, and infection at the puncture site may occur. In very uncommon cases, there can be swelling of the vein after the blood withdrawal.

Q. Is the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test safe for children?

Yes, the Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test is considered safe for children.

Q. What is the best way to treat celiac disease?

The most effective treatment for celiac disease is to follow a strict gluten-free diet for life.

Q. What foods are gluten-free?

Gluten-free foods include fruits and vegetables, beans, seeds, legumes, nuts, fish and poultry products, and low-fat dairy products such as cheese, butter, rice, soy, corn, and potatoes.

Q. Is there any cure for celiac disease?

Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease. However, following a gluten-free diet can help you ease your celiac disease symptoms.
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Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody - IgA test price for other cities


Price inGurgaonRs. 989
Price inBangaloreRs. 989
Price inMumbaiRs. 989
Price inNoidaRs. 959
Price inGhaziabadRs. 989
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References

  1. Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody [Internet]. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Medical Center; [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?contenttypeid=167&contentid=antitissue_transglutaminase_antibody External Link
  2. Symptoms & Causes of Celiac Disease [Internet]. NIH; Oct. 2020. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/celiac-disease/symptoms-causes External Link
  3. Sarno M, Discepolo V, Troncone R, Auricchio R. Risk factors for celiac disease. Ital J Pediatr. 2015 Aug 14;41:57. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4535670/ External Link
  4. Rashid M, Lee J. Serologic testing in celiac disease: Practical guide for clinicians. Can Fam Physician. 2016 Jan;62(1):38-43. PMID: 26796833; PMCID: PMC4721839. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4721839/ External Link
  5. Celiac Disease [Internet]. NIH; Oct. 2020. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/celiac-disease#:~:text=Eating%2C%20Diet%2C%20%26%20Nutrition,-If%20you%20have&text=Following%20a%20gluten%2Dfree%20diet,gluten%2Dfree%20diet%20for%20life. External Link
  6. Coeliac disease [Internet]. Healthdirect; Jun. 2022 [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/coeliac-disease#:~:text=Coeliac%20disease%20External Link
  7. Eating, Diet, & Nutrition for Celiac Disease [Internet]. NIH; Oct. 2020. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/celiac-disease/eating-diet-nutrition External Link
  8. Dahlbom I, Olsson M, Forooz NK, Sjöholm AG, Truedsson L, Hansson T. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies used as markers for IgA-deficient celiac disease patients. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2005 Feb;12(2):254-8. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC549312/ External Link
  9. Parzanese I, Qehajaj D, Patrinicola F, Aralica M, Chiriva-Internati M, Stifter S, Elli L, Grizzi F. Celiac disease: From pathophysiology to treatment. World J Gastrointest Pathophysiol. 2017 May 15;8(2):27-38. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5437500/ External Link
  10. Makharia GK, Verma AK, Amarchand R, Bhatnagar S, Das P, Goswami A, Bhatia V, Ahuja V, Datta Gupta S, Anand K. Prevalence of celiac disease in the northern part of India: a community based study. J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 May;26(5):894-900. [Accessed 14 Dec. 2023]. Available from: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21182543/ External Link

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