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Understanding the Test
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Content created by
Written by
Dr. Shreya Gupta
BDS, MDS - Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology
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Dr. Ashish Ranjan
MBBS, MD (Pharmacology)
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TCS Wellness Package Pathology in New Delhi

TCS Wellness Package Pathology in New Delhi Test Includes 44 testsView All
You need to provide
Blood, Urine, Sputum
This test is for
Male, Female
Test Preparation
  1. Overnight fasting (8-12 hrs) is required. Do not eat or drink anything except water before the test.
  2. The urine sample must preferably be the first-morning midstream urine (part of urine that comes after the first and before the last stream). Collect the urine sample in a sealed and sterile screw-capped container provided by our sample collection professional. Ensure that the urethral area (from where the urine is passed) is clean & the container doesn't come in contact with your skin. Women are advised not to give the sample during the menstrual period unless prescribed.

Understanding TCS Wellness Package Pathology in New Delhi


What is TCS Wellness Package Pathology in New Delhi?

TCS Wellness Package Pathology is a comprehensive health assessment that helps you understand your current health status. This package comprises a complete blood test, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) test, diabetes screening (glycosylated hemoglobin test and glucose fasting test), ultrasensitive thyroid stimulating hormone, liver function test, kidney function test, lipid profile, urine analysis, blood pressure monitoring and body mass index (BMI) test. Test parameters offered in this package can help detect health conditions early on and allow your doctor to provide recommendations for lifestyle modifications or medications to manage your condition and formulate an overall treatment plan.

What does TCS Wellness Package Pathology measure?

Contains 44 tests

Complete Blood Count

Blood Pressure

BMI/Obesity

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ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate)

An ESR test measures the rate at which red blood cells (erythrocytes) settle (sediment) in one hour at the bottom of a tube that contains a blood sample.

When there is inflammation in the body, certain proteins, mainly fibrinogen, increase in the blood. This increased amount of fibrinogen causes the red blood cells to form a stack (rouleaux formation) that settles quickly due to its high density, leading to an increase in the ESR.

An ESR test is a non-specific measure of inflammation and can be affected by conditions other than inflammation. This test cannot identify the exact location of the inflammation in your body or what is causing it. Hence, an ESR test is usually performed along with a few other tests to identify or treat possible health concerns.

Know more about ESR (Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate)

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Lipid Profile

A Lipid Profile assesses the level of specific fat molecules called lipids in the blood and helps determine the risk of heart ailments. This test determines the amount of different types of lipids, including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglycerides. Lipids play a pivotal role in the functioning of the body. They are crucial components of the cell membranes and hormones, provide cushioning, and are a storehouse of energy. Any alterations in the lipid levels may lead to potential heart ailments, making their monitoring crucial.

Know more about Lipid Profile

  • Total Cholesterol/HDL Cholesterol Ratio

  • A Total Cholesterol/HDL Cholesterol Ratio measures the ratio of total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)/good cholesterol in your blood which is a significant indicator of cardiovascular health. This ratio is calculated by dividing the total cholesterol by the HDL number. A high ratio indicates a higher amount of 'bad' cholesterol relative to 'good' cholesterol, implying a higher risk of developing heart disease. Conversely, a lower ratio implies a higher amount of 'good' cholesterol relative to 'bad' cholesterol, indicating a lower risk.

  • Very Low Density Lipoprotein

  • A Very Low Density Lipoprotein test measures the concentration of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol in the blood. VLDL cholesterol plays a vital role in the body's metabolic processes. It is produced by the liver and is used to transport triglycerides, a type of fat, from the liver to various tissues throughout the body, where they are either utilized for energy or stored for later use. Though VLDL cholesterol is essential for the body's normal functioning, it is harmful if present in excess amounts. By measuring VLDL cholesterol levels, your doctor can assess your risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and recommend appropriate preventive or treatment strategies.

  • Cholesterol - LDL

  • A Cholesterol - LDL test measures the concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the blood. LDL cholesterol plays an important role in your body. It carries cholesterol from your liver to other parts of the body where it's needed for things like building cell walls and making hormones. However, it is often referred to as "bad" cholesterol because when present in excess in your blood, it can stick to your blood vessel walls leading to the formation of plaque, making them narrow and less flexible. When this happens, it's harder for the blood to flow, which can lead to heart problems, like heart attacks and strokes. By measuring LDL cholesterol levels, your doctor can assess your risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and can recommend appropriate preventive or treatment strategies.

  • Triglycerides

  • A Triglycerides test measures the amount of triglycerides in the blood and helps evaluate your risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Triglycerides are a type of fat (lipid) that your body uses as a source of energy. When you consume more calories than your body needs, the excess calories are converted into triglycerides and stored in fat cells for later use. High triglyceride levels can contribute to the hardening and narrowing of arteries, increasing the risk of heart attack, stroke, and other related conditions. 

  • Cholesterol - Total

  • A Cholesterol - Total test measures the total amount of cholesterol (fats) in your blood. Cholesterol is mainly synthesized in the liver and partially in the intestines. It acts as a building block for cell membranes, serves as a precursor to vital hormones, and helps in the production of bile acids that help digest fats. Cholesterol is transported through the blood by two kinds of proteins: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). An optimal amount of these proteins is necessary for proper body functioning.

  • Cholesterol - HDL

  • A Cholesterol - HDL test measures the concentration of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in the blood. HDL cholesterol plays a crucial role in maintaining cardiovascular health, as it helps transport excess low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol from the bloodstream back to the liver for excretion. This process prevents the buildup of plaque on the blood vessel walls, which can cause them to become narrow and less flexible. Higher levels of HDL cholesterol are generally associated with a lower risk of heart problems, such as heart attacks and strokes. By measuring HDL cholesterol levels, your doctor can assess your risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and can recommend appropriate preventive or treatment strategies, including lifestyle modifications and medications.

  • Non HDL Cholesterol

  • A Non HDL Cholesterol test looks for the “bad” cholesterol particles that are likely to contribute to heart problems. These bad particles include LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, VLDL (very-low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and remnants of other cholesterol-carrying molecules. Cholesterol is a waxy substance that circulates in your bloodstream and is essential for various bodily functions. However, too much of “bad” types of cholesterol can build up in your arteries and increase the risk of heart conditions. LDL and VLDL cholesterol particles are often referred to as the "bad" cholesterol because they can stick to the walls of your arteries and form plaque, narrowing the arteries and restricting blood flow to your heart. By measuring non-HDL cholesterol, your doctor can assess your risk of heart disease and determine if any interventions or lifestyle changes are needed to protect your heart.

  • LDL/HDL Ratio

  • An LDL/HDL Ratio test measures the ratio of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) to high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in your blood. These two types of lipoproteins carry cholesterol throughout the body. LDL, often referred to as the 'bad' cholesterol, carries cholesterol to the cells that need it. However, if there is too much LDL cholesterol in the blood, it can combine with other substances and form plaque in the arteries, leading to cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, HDL, often referred to as the 'good' cholesterol, helps remove other forms of cholesterol, including LDL, from the bloodstream. It transports cholesterol back to the liver, where it is broken down and eliminated from the body, thus reducing the risk of cholesterol buildup and heart disease. The LDL/HDL ratio is a significant indicator of cardiovascular health. A high ratio indicates a higher amount of 'bad' cholesterol relative to 'good' cholesterol, implying a higher risk of developing heart disease. Conversely, a lower ratio implies a higher amount of 'good' cholesterol relative to 'bad' cholesterol, indicating a lower risk.

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Kidney Function test (7 Parameters)

  • Bicarbonate

  • Sodium

  • A Sodium test is used to measure the amount of sodium in your body. Sodium is present in all body fluids and is found in the highest concentration in the extracellular fluid. The body absorbs the required amount of sodium through dietary salts and the remaining is eliminated through the kidneys. The body keeps your blood sodium within a normal and steady range by following three mechanisms:

    • By producing hormones that control the elimination of sodium through urine, such as natriuretic peptides and aldosterone.

    • By producing hormones that prevent water loss, such as antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or vasopressin.

    • By controlling thirst (an increase in blood sodium level can make you thirsty and cause you to drink water, returning your sodium to normal).

    These mechanisms regulate the amount of water and sodium in the body and control blood pressure by keeping the amount of water in check. When the level of sodium in the blood changes, the water content in your body changes. These changes can be associated with dehydration, edema, and change in blood pressure.

  • Potassium

  • A Potassium test measures the levels of potassium in your body. Potassium is one of the key electrolytes that helps in the functioning of the kidneys, heart, nerves, and muscles. It also balances the effect of sodium and helps keep your blood pressure normal. The body absorbs the required amount of potassium from the dietary sources and eliminates the remaining quantity through urine. Potassium level is typically maintained by the hormone aldosterone. Aldosterone acts on the nephrons present in the kidneys and activates the sodium-potassium pump that helps the body reabsorb sodium and excrete potassium. This aids in maintaining a regular and steady potassium level in the blood.

  • Uric Acid

  • A Uric Acid test determines the level of uric acid in your body. Uric acid is a nitrogenous compound produced by the metabolic breakdown of purine. Purines are present as nitrogenous bases in the DNA and are also found in food like red meat and seafood.

    Most uric acid dissolves in the blood and goes into your kidneys. From there, it passes through your body via the urine. Decreased elimination of uric acid is often a result of impaired kidney function due to kidney disease. In many cases, the exact cause of excess uric acid is unknown. Doctors seldom need to test for low levels of uric acid.

  • Chloride

  • A Chloride test measures the amount of chloride in your body. Chloride is present in all body fluids and is found in the highest concentration in the blood and extracellular fluid (fluid present outside the cells). The body gets most of the chloride through dietary salt (sodium chloride or NaCl) and a small amount through other food items. The required amount of chloride is absorbed in the body and the excess amount is excreted by the kidneys through urine. When the chloride is combined with sodium it is mostly found in nature as salt. Chloride generally increases or decreases in direct relationship to sodium but may also change without any changes in sodium levels when there are problems with the body's pH. Usually, the normal blood chloride level remains steady with a slight fall after meals (because the stomach produces hydrochloric acid using chloride from the blood after we eat food).

  • Serum Creatinine

  • A Serum Creatinine test measures the level of creatinine in the blood. Creatinine is a byproduct of muscles’ wear and tear during energy production. The kidneys remove it from the body by filtering it from the blood and releasing it into the urine. Therefore, blood creatinine levels indicate how well the kidneys are functioning in filtering and removing waste products from the blood. Generally, higher creatinine levels in the blood may indicate reduced kidney function, while lower levels may suggest decreased muscle mass.

    Creatinine levels are also used with other factors, such as age and gender, to calculate the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The eGFR is a more comprehensive indicator of kidney function, helps determine appropriate drug dosages, and is essential for assessing the potential toxicity of drugs on the kidneys.

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LFT (Liver Function Test)

An LFT (Liver Function Test) helps determine the health of your liver by measuring various components like enzymes, proteins, and bilirubin. These components help detect inflammation, infection, diseases, etc., of the liver and monitor the damage due to liver-related issues.

Know more about LFT (Liver Function Test)

  • Protein Total, Serum

  • A Protein Total, Serum test measures the amount of proteins in the body. Proteins are known as the building blocks of all cells and tissues. They play a crucial role in the growth and development of most of your organs and in making enzymes and hormones. There are two types of proteins found in the body, namely albumin and globulin. About 60% of the total protein is made up of albumin, which is produced by the liver. It helps to carry small molecules such as hormones, minerals, and medicines throughout the body. It also serves as a source of amino acids for tissue metabolism. On the other hand, globulin is a group of proteins that are made by the liver and the immune system. They play an important role in liver functioning, blood clotting, and fighting off infections.

    This further contains

    • Albumin/Globulin Ratio, Serum
    • Globulin, Serum
    • Serum Albumin
    • Protein Total
  • Bilirubin Indirect

  • A Bilirubin Indirect test measures the amount of indirect or unconjugated bilirubin in your body. Bilirubin is a yellowish byproduct primarily produced when your body breaks down aged red blood cells (RBCs). When RBCs finish their lifespan of 120 days, they break down and pass to your liver. Indirect bilirubin, a form of bilirubin that is unconjugated (not soluble in water), is bound to the protein albumin that helps transport it to the liver. When the liver processes the bilirubin, it unbinds from the albumin and binds to a sugar molecule, making it water-soluble. This water-soluble bilirubin is mixed with bile, excreted in the bile ducts, and stored in your gallbladder. Finally, bile is released into the small intestine to help digest fat and is eventually excreted with your stool as a waste product.

  • Bilirubin Direct

  • A Bilirubin Direct test measures the amount of direct or conjugated bilirubin present in your body. Bilirubin is a yellowish byproduct primarily produced when the body breaks down aged RBCs. When the RBCs finish their lifespan of 120 days, they break down and pass to the liver. In the liver, direct bilirubin–a form of bilirubin conjugated with glucuronic acid (sugar)–is processed, mixed with bile, and then excreted in the bile ducts and stored in your gallbladder. Finally, the bile is released into the small intestine where it is further broken down and helps digest fat. It is eventually excreted within your stool as a waste product.

    Elevated levels of bilirubin can be indicative of various liver or bile duct issues. Additionally, higher bilirubin levels might result from an increased breakdown of red blood cells in the body.

  • Gamma Glutamyl Transferase

  • Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) is an enzyme found in various organs, with the highest concentration in the liver. Usually, this enzyme is present in low levels in the blood. However, when there is liver damage or disease, GGT is released into the bloodstream, causing an increase in GGT levels. In addition to the liver, GGT can also be elevated in conditions affecting the bile ducts or the pancreas. It is usually, the first liver enzyme to rise in the blood when there is any damage or obstruction in the bile duct, making it one of the most sensitive liver enzyme tests for detecting bile duct problems.

  • Bilirubin Total

  • A Bilirubin Total examination quantifies the levels of total bilirubin in the body, encompassing both indirect (unconjugated) and direct (conjugated) bilirubin. Bilirubin, a yellowish waste substance, is primarily generated during the breakdown of aging red blood cells (RBCs) in the body. After their typical lifespan of 120 days, RBCs disintegrate in the liver, leading to the production of a substantial amount of bilirubin. It is crucial for this bilirubin to be eliminated from the body.

  • SGPT

  • An SGPT test measures the amount of ALT or SGPT enzyme in your blood. ALT is most abundantly found in the liver, but it is also present in smaller amounts in other organs like the kidneys, heart, and muscles. Its primary function is to convert food into energy. It also speeds up chemical reactions in the body. These chemical reactions include the production of bile and substances that help your blood clot, break down food and toxins, and fight off an infection.

    Elevated levels of ALT in the blood may indicate liver damage or injury. When the liver cells are damaged, they release ALT into the bloodstream, causing an increase in ALT levels. Therefore, the SGPT/ALT test is primarily used to assess the health of the liver and to detect liver-related problems such as hepatitis, fatty liver disease, cirrhosis, or other liver disorders.

  • Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

  • An Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) test measures the quantity of ALP enzyme present throughout the body. The main sources of this enzyme are the liver and bones. It exists in different forms depending on where it originates, such as liver ALP, bone ALP, and intestinal ALP. In the liver, it is found on the edges of the cells that join together to form bile ducts. 

    ALP levels can be increased during pregnancy as it is found in the placenta of pregnant women. It is also higher in children because their bones are in the growth phase. ALP is often high during growth spurts (a short period when an individual experiences quick physical growth in height and body weight).

  • SGOT

  • An SGOT test measures the levels of serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), also known as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), an enzyme produced by the liver. SGOT is present in most body cells, most abundantly in the liver and heart. The primary function of this enzyme is to convert food into glycogen (a form of glucose), which is stored in the cells, primarily the liver. The body uses this glycogen to generate energy for various body functions.

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Urine R/M (Urine Routine & Microscopy)

A Urine R/M (Urine Routine & Microscopy) test involves gross, chemical, and microscopic evaluation of the urine sample.

  1. Gross examination: It involves visually inspecting the urine sample for color and appearance. Typically, the urine color ranges from colorless or pale yellow to deep amber, depending on the urine’s concentration. Things such as medications, supplements, and some foods such as beetroot can affect the color of your urine. However, unusual urine color can also be a sign of disease.

    In appearance, the urine sample may be clear or cloudy. A clear appearance is indicative of healthy urine. However, the presence of red blood cells, white blood cells, bacteria, etc., may result in cloudy urine, indicating conditions such as dehydration, UTIs, kidney stones, etc. Some other factors, such as sperm and skin cells, may also result in a cloudy appearance but are harmless.

  2. Chemical examination: It examines the chemical nature of the urine sample using special test strips called dipsticks. These test strips are dipped into the urine sample and change color when they come in contact with specific substances. The degree of color change estimates the amount of the substance present. Some common things detected include protein, urine pH, ketones, glucose, specific gravity, blood, nitrites, and urobilinogen.

  3. Microscopic examination: This involves the analysis of the urine sample under the microscope for casts, crystals, cells, bacteria, and yeast. 

Know more about Urine R/M (Urine Routine & Microscopy)

  • Nitrite

  • Colour

  • Appearance

  • Specific Gravity

  • Epithelial Cell

  • Casts

  • Urobilinogen

  • Ketone

  • Crystals

  • Protein Urine

  • Ph for Urine

  • Urine Glucose

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HbA1c (Hemoglobin A1c)

An HbA1c (Hemoglobin A1c) test precisely measures the percentage of sugar-coated or glycated hemoglobin in your blood. The test results represent the proportion of hemoglobin in your blood that has been glycated. 

Hemoglobin, a vital protein found in red blood cells, is responsible for transporting oxygen throughout the body. Hemoglobin A is the most abundant form of hemoglobin, and when blood sugar levels increase, a higher proportion of hemoglobin A becomes glycated. As red blood cells have a lifespan of approximately 120 days, the sugar molecules remain attached to the hemoglobin for the duration of the cell's life. Consequently, the HbA1c test offers insight into your average blood sugar levels over the past 8 to 12 weeks. 

Know more about HbA1c (Hemoglobin A1c)

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FBS (Fasting Blood Sugar)

A fasting blood sugar test measures the glucose level in the body under overnight fasting conditions. Glucose serves as the body's energy currency and is broken down through metabolism to produce energy. Hormones and enzymes produced by the liver and pancreas control this process. The hormone insulin, produced by the pancreas, regulates blood glucose levels. When these levels are high, such as after a meal, insulin is secreted to transport glucose into cells for energy production. Elevated glucose levels in the body after fasting may indicate a risk of developing prediabetes or diabetes, which can be of two types- Type 1, caused by little or no insulin production, and Type 2, caused by insulin resistance or decreased insulin production.

Know more about FBS (Fasting Blood Sugar)

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TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) Ultrasensitive

A TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) Ultrasensitive test measures the levels of TSH hormone in the blood. TSH is produced by the pituitary gland located in the brain. Its function is to stimulate and regulate the functioning of the thyroid gland. It signals the thyroid gland to increase or decrease the production of thyroid hormones T3 and T4 (essential for regulating our body’s metabolism, temperature, heart rate, and growth) when their levels are low or high, respectively. Therefore, when the levels of T3 & T4 decrease, the pituitary gland is stimulated to release TSH. This high TSH level, in turn, stimulates the thyroid gland to release more thyroid hormones (T3 & T4); the vice-versa happens when the levels of thyroid hormones increase.

Know more about TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) Ultrasensitive

TCS Wellness Package Pathology test price for other cities


Price inMumbaiRs. 780
Price inThaneRs. 780
Price inHyderabadRs. 780
Price inPuneRs. 780
Price inNavi MumbaiRs. 780
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