1mg, best e pharmacy in India


MRP: Rs. 55 for 1 packet(s) (5 ML eye drop each)
Unfortunately, we don't have any more items in stock

food interaction for OPTIHIST PLUS

alcohol interaction for OPTIHIST PLUS

pregnancy interaction for OPTIHIST PLUS

lactation interaction for OPTIHIST PLUS

There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Optihist plus eye drop may cause excessive drowsiness and calmness with alcohol.
Optihist plus eye drop may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Either animal studies have shown adverse effect on fetus and there are no human studies or studies in human and animals are not available. It should be given only if potential benefits justifies risk to the fetus. Please consult your doctor.
Unknown. Human and animal studies are not available. Please consult your doctor.


Chlorpheniramine(0.03% w/v)


Chlorpheniramine is used to relieve symptoms of  runny nose, sneezing, itching, and watery eyes caused by allergies, the common cold, or the flu and allergies due to food and insect bites and hay fever.

How it works

Chlorpheniramine belongs to class of medications called antihistamines. It acts by blocking a natural chemical (histamine) that your body makes during an allergic reaction. Histamine is responsible for many symptoms of allergy. 

Common side effects

Nausea, Constipation, Drowsiness, Dry mouth, Dry throat, Dry skin, Headache, Inability to empty the urinary bladder, Loss of appetite, Nasal congestion, Chest congestion, Vomiting
Sodium Chloride(0.05% w/v)


Sodium chloride is used as a source of electrolytes (minerals in body fluids) and water to prevent dehydration (when loss of water exceeds water intake) and replenish the loss of sodium from body fluids in conditions like metabolic alkalosis (acid-base imbalance in body fluids that can cause serious complications) or diarrhea. It is also used as a solvent for reconstitution of medications or diluting agent for administration of medications intravenously.

How it works

Sodium chloride belongs to the class of medications called electrolytes or osmotic agents. It works by controlling fluid and electrolyte balance and increases water retention (by regulating osmotic pressure), thereby increasing water content in the body. It also plays an important role in maintenance of acid-base balance of body fluids. 

Common side effects

Application site redness of skin, Application site irritation, Increased sodium level in blood, Decreased sodium level in blood, Injection-site reactions, Injection site swelling, Chills, Fever
Boric Acid(1.25% w/v)


Boric acid is used as an antiseptic for inflamed eyelids, as a skin protectant, and for superficial fungal infections.

How it works

Boric acid belongs to class of drugs called antiseptics. It can weakly inhibit bacterial and fungal growth. It irrigates the eyes, cleanses, refreshes and soothes the irritated eyes; and help in removal of loose foreign material, air pollutants or chlorinated water.

Common side effects

Liver enzyme increased, Abdominal pain, Allergic reaction, Burning sensation, Irritation, Cns stimulation, Central nervous system depression, Diarrhoea, Rash, Vomiting
Tetrahydrozoline(0.01% w/v)


Tetrahydrozoline is a decongestant used to relieve redness in the eyes caused by minor eye irritations (e.g., smog, swimming, dust, or smoke). It belongs to a class of drugs known as sympathomimetic amines.

How it works

It works by temporarily narrowing the blood vessels in the eye.

Common side effects

Nervousness, Blurred vision, Dilatation of the pupil of the eye, Eye redness, Eye irritation, Headache, Increased sweating, Tachycardia, Heart rate irregular, Burning sensation in eye, Teary eyes


No substitutes found

Expert advice for OPTIHIST PLUS

  • Do not start or continue the chlorpheniramine tablets and consult your doctor, If you are allergic (hypersensitive) to chlorpheniramine or any of the other ingredients of chlorpheniramine tablet.
  • Do not take this medicine without consulting your doctor, if you are pregnant or breast feeding.
  • Do not take for longer than 7 days in a row. Talk with your doctor, if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have a fever with a headache or skin rash.
  • Do not drive or operate machinery after taking chlorpheniramine because you may feel sleepy.

Frequently asked questions for OPTIHIST PLUS


Q. Does chlorpheniramine or chlorpheniramine maleate cause increase in blood pressure/ drowsy/non drowsy/sedating/get you high/keep you awake/sleepiness/make you tired/weight gain?
Chlorpheniramine causing these side effects is common or rare. Always consult your doctor, if you experience any of these side effects.
Q. Is chlorpheniramine like Benadryl?
No, chlorpheniramine is different from Benadryl.
Q. Is chlorpheniramine prescription?
Yes, it is available with doctor’s prescription only.
Q.Can I take chlorpheniramine or chlorpheniramine maleate with Panadol/ cetirizine /Zyrtec/ Allegra/ warfarin/ diphenhydramine/ ibuprofen/Claritin/guaifenesin/Benadryl?
Yes, but taking other medicines may alter the effects of chlorpheniramine. Always consult your doctor for the change of dose regimen or an alternative drug of choice that may strictly be required.
Q. Does chlorpheniramine contain aspirin?
No, it does not contain aspirin in it. Chlorpheniramine is a different drug than aspirin.

Sodium Chloride

Q. Is sodium chloride soluble in water?
Sodium chloride is soluble in water.

Is sodium chloride acidic or basic?
Sodium chloride is a neutral salt (neither acidic nor basic).

Is sodium chloride ionic or covalent?
Sodium chloride is an example of ionic bonding, where the molecule is formed by ionization of participating atoms and attraction between them.

Q. Does sodium chloride expire?
Normally, sodium chloride does not have an expiry date if stored under appropriate conditions.

Q. Is sodium chloride polar?
Sodium chloride is ionic, which is considered highly polar.

Q. Is sodium chloride an antioxidant?
Sodium chloride does not possess antioxidant property.

Top Medicines Prescribed with OPTIHIST PLUS EYE DROP


Content on this page was last updated on 18 June, 2014, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)