Progesterone Topical

Information about Progesterone Topical

Progesterone topical uses

Progesterone Topical is used in the treatment of female infertility.

How progesterone topical works

Progesterone topical is a progestin (female hormones). It works as part of hormone replacement therapy by replacing the amount of oestrogen in the uterus. It works to bring on menstruation by replacing the natural progesterone that some women are missing.

Common side effects of progesterone topical

Headache, Abdominal pain, Abdominal distension, Nausea, Uterine contractions.

Available Medicine for Progesterone Topical

Expert advice for Progesterone Topical

  • Tell your doctor if you experience any unexpected bleeding. 
  • Tell your doctor if you have any conditions like recurrent fits, migraine, asthma, and heart or kidney dysfunction, as progesterone causes fluid retention and may worsen these conditions.
  • Do not use progesterone vaginal preparation simultaneously with any other vaginal therapy.
  • Exercise caution if you are suffering from abnormal glucose tolerance as progesterone might interfere in glucose metabolism.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding.
  • Do not use if you are allergic to progesterone or any of its ingredients.
  • Do not use if you have undiagnosed vaginal bleeding, blood clot in veins (thrombophlebitis) or those who have severe liver damage.
  • Do not use if you are suffering from or with history of any bleeding disorder (active deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism).
  • Do not use if you have progesterone sensitive tumors.

Frequently asked questions for Progesterone Topical

Progesterone Topical

Q. Is progesterone a steroid?
Progesterone is a steroidal hormone naturally produced by the body and essential for the maintenance of a healthy uterus
Q. Is estrogen and progesterone the same?
No. Estrogen and progesterone are two different steroidal hormones that work together for the development and maintenance of the female reproductive system
Q. Is progesterone an androgen / diuretic / probiotic?
Progesterone belongs to a class of medications called as progestins (female hormones) and is different from androgens (predominantly male hormones). It is not a diuretic or probiotic
Show More
Q. Is utrogestan bioidentical/ natural progesterone / containing HCG?
Yes. Utrogestan is a trade name for hormone progesterone. It is structurally and functionally identical to the progesterone hormone naturally produced by the body and therefore bioidentical. It is sometimes referred to as natural progesterone, although it is synthesized in laboratories. It does not contain human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) hormone
Q. Is utrogestan same as cycloset?
No. Utrogestan and cycloset contain different active drugs. Utrogestan is a trade name for hormone progesterone. Cycloset is a trade name for active drug bromocriptine
Q. Does progesterone/susten/susten400/susten100/utrogestan delay or stop period?
Susten and utrogestan are trade names for hormone progesterone. Progesterone can delay or stop periods for as long as it is taken. Your periods will return within a few days of stopping
Q. Does progesterone increase breast size / cause acne/ sleepiness?
Progesterone has a side effect of causing breast tenderness, discomfort and increase in breast size. Acne is also a common side effect of taking progesterone. You may experience sleepiness and dizziness for few hours after taking progesterone
Q. Can I take progesterone without a uterus?
Progesterone is not needed in women without a uterus or those who have undergone hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus)
Q. Can I take progesterone with levothyroxine/synthroid/ tamoxifen/clomid?
There are no known drug interactions between progesterone when taken with synthroid (active drug- levothyroxine) or tamoxifen or clomid (active drug- clomiphene). However, inform your doctor about all medications currently taken before starting and while on progesterone
Q. Can I just take progesterone without estrogen?
Yes. Your doctor may prescribe medicines that contain only progesterone.

Content on this page was last updated on 08 June, 2017, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)