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    Minocycline

    Information about Minocycline

    Minocycline uses

    Minocycline is used in the treatment of bacterial infections.

    How minocycline works

    Minocycline is an antibiotic. It stops bacterial growth by preventing synthesis of essential proteins required by bacteria to carry out vital functions.

    Common side effects of minocycline

    Headache, Dizziness, Photosensitivity, Vomiting, Nausea, Itching, Diarrhea
    Content Details
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    Written By
    Dr. Love Sharma
    PhD (Pharmacology), PGDPRA
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    Reviewed By
    Dr. Shilpa Garcha
    MD (Pharmacology), MBBS
    Last updated on:
    18 Feb 2020 | 05:21 PM (IST)
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    Available Medicine for Minocycline

    • ₹229 to ₹438
      Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
      5 variant(s)
    • ₹210 to ₹265
      Pfizer Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹241 to ₹2475
      Cipla Ltd
      3 variant(s)
    • ₹235 to ₹388
      Micro Labs Ltd
      2 variant(s)
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      Ajanta Pharma Ltd
      3 variant(s)
    • ₹219 to ₹400
      Ipca Laboratories Ltd
      3 variant(s)
    • ₹2250
      Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      1 variant(s)
    • ₹207 to ₹289
      Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹198 to ₹298
      Indiabulls pharmaceutical ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹999
      Gufic Bioscience Ltd
      1 variant(s)

    Expert advice for Minocycline

    • Your doctor has prescribed Minocycline to cure your infection and improve symptoms.
    • Do not skip any doses and finish the full course of treatment even if you feel better. Stopping it early may make the infection to come back and harder to treat.
    • It may cause dizziness. Don't drive or do anything that requires mental focus until you know how Minocycline affects you.
    • Diarrhea may occur as a side effect but should stop when your course is complete. Inform your doctor if it doesn't stop or if you find blood in your stools.
    • Inform your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to conceive or breastfeeding.
    • Discontinue Minocycline and inform your doctor immediately if you get a rash, itchy skin, swelling of face and mouth, or have difficulty in breathing.

    Frequently asked questions for Minocycline

    Minocycline

    Q. Can Minocycline get you high?

    No, Minocycline is not known to get anyone high. It does not cause dependence either physical or psychological. Also, it does not have any abuse potential.

    Q. What does Minocycline do for acne?

    Minocycline belongs to tetracycline class of medicine. It treats the infection by preventing the growth and spread of bacteria. It kills the acne-causing bacteria, which infect pores. It also decreases certain natural oily substance that causes acne.

    Q. Does Minocycline affect contraception?

    Minocycline reduces the effectiveness of oral birth control pills. Therefore, one should use other methods of contraception while on treatment with Minocycline. Discuss with your doctor if you are not sure.

    Q. Can I take Minocycline during pregnancy?

    Minocycline should be avoided during pregnancy as it may cause harm to your unborn baby. Using the medicine during the last half of pregnancy may cause permanent discolouration of teeth and underdevelopment of tooth enamel. Discuss with your doctor for any further query.

    Q. Does Minocycline cause dizziness?

    Yes, Minocycline may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, visual disturbances, ringing in the ears, and a feeling of spinning (vertigo). If you experience any of these symptoms avoid driving or operating machinery.

    Q. What should I avoid while on Minocycline?

    Minocycline may make your skin sensitive to sunlight. Avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight. It is advised to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Furthermore, avoid alcohol while on Minocycline as it may increase risk of liver toxicity.

    Content on this page was last updated on 18 February, 2020, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)