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    Insulin Lispro

    Information about Insulin Lispro

    Insulin lispro uses

    Insulin Lispro is used in the treatment of diabetes. It is indicated in patients with diabetes mellitus who require insulin for the maintenance of normal glucose homeostasis. It is also indicated for the initial stabilization of diabetes mellitus.

    How insulin lispro works

    Insulin Lispro is a fast-acting insulin, starts working within 10-20 minutes after injection. It works similar to insulin produced by the body. Insulin facilitates reuptake of sugar in muscle and fat cells and also suppresses the production of sugar in the liver.

    Common side effects of insulin lispro

    Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar level), Injection site allergic reaction, Skin thickening or pits at the injection site (Lipodystrophy), Itching, Rash

    Available Medicine for Insulin Lispro

    • ₹617 to ₹704
      Lupin Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹617 to ₹1408
      Eli Lilly and Company India Pvt Ltd
      3 variant(s)

    Expert advice for Insulin Lispro

    • Humalog may be taken shortly before meals. When necessary, it can be taken soon after meals.
    • It should be given by subcutaneous injection or by a continuous subcutaneous infusion pump. Subcutaneous administration should be in the upper arms, thighs, buttocks, or abdomen. Use of injection sites should be rotated so that the same site is not used more than approximately once a month.
    • Injection below the skin of the abdomen results in faster absorption than other injection sites.
    • When administered subcutaneously, care should be taken to ensure that a blood vessel has not been entered. After injection, the site of injection should not be massaged.
    • Do not use if the preparation is no longer clear and colourless, or if it contains particles.
    • The insulin device should be stored at 2°C - 8°C (in a refrigerator). Do not freeze. Do not expose to excessive heat or direct sunlight. Once in use, it may be used for up to 28 days.
    • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar level) is a common side-effect; learn how to identify and manage its symptoms (sweating, rapid heartbeat, weakness, blurry vision, headache) and teach your family as well.

    Frequently asked questions for Insulin Lispro

    Insulin Lispro

    Q. What are the serious side effects that may be caused by Insulin Lispro?

    Insulin Lispro may cause serious side effects like low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) with signs and symptoms of dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, hunger, anxiety, irritability, or mood changes. Other serious side effects may include low potassium in your blood (hypokalemia), change in the level of physical activity or exercise, weight gain or loss, change in diet or illness. It can cause serious allergic reactions which may include rash over the whole body, trouble breathing, a fast heartbeat, sweating and a feeling of fainting. Fluid retention and heart failure can also be seen in patients who are also taking other anti-diabetic medicines like Thiazolidinediones (TZDs).

    Q. What should I do if I am experiencing any side effects?

    If you are experiencing any side effects, please contact your doctor.

    Q. Where do I inject Insulin Lispro?

    Rotate between typical injection sites, such as the abdomen, buttocks, upper legs, or upper arms. Never inject Insulin Lispro into a muscle or vein.

    Q. How do I inject the dose of my insulin?

    Wash your hands before injecting. Choose a site for injection. Clean the skin as instructed. Remove outer needle cap. Stabilize the skin by spreading it or pinching up a large area. Insert the needle as instructed. Press the knob. Pull the needle out and apply gentle pressure over the injection site for several seconds. Do not rub the area. Using the outer needle cap, unscrew the needle and dispose of it safely. Use of injection sites should be rotated so that the same site is not used more than approximately once a month.

    Q. Must I prime my pen before using it?

    Yes, you need to prime your pen. If you do not prime, you may get too much or too little insulin. You will turn the dose knob to 2 units. Hold your pen with the needle pointing up. Tap the cartridge holder gently to collect air bubbles at the top. Continue holding your pen with the needle pointing up. Push the dose knob in until it stops and "0" is seen in the dose window. Hold the dose knob in and count to 5 slowly. You should see insulin at the tip of the needle.

    Q. What should I do if the dose knob is hard to push?

    Pushing the dose knob more slowly will make it easier to inject or your needle may be blocked. Put on a new needle and prime the pen.

    Q. Which drugs may increase the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar level) when given along with Insulin Lispro?

    The risk of hypoglycemia associated with Insulin Lispro use may be increased when co-administered with antidiabetic agents, salicylates, sulfonamide antibiotics, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, fluoxetine, pramlintide, disopyramide, fibrates, propoxyphene, pentoxifylline, ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blocking agents, and somatostatin analogs (e.g., octreotide). Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when Insulin Lispro is co-administered with these drugs.

    Q. Does Insulin Lispro need to be refrigerated?

    Unopened cartridges and unused pre-filled pens of Insulin Lispro must be stored in a refrigerator where the temperature is between 2-8°C. When the cartridge has been inserted into the injection pen, it should not be put in the refrigerator and should be kept at room temperature

    Q. Can Insulin Lispro be mixed with other insulin preparations?

    Insulin Lispro solution must not be mixed with any other insulin preparation. Also, do not mix insulin in vials with insulin in cartridges.

    Q. Which drugs may decrease the blood glucose lowering effect of Insulin Lispro?

    The glucose-lowering effect of Insulin Lispro may be decreased when co-administered with corticosteroids, isoniazid, niacin, estrogens, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, danazol, diuretics, sympathomimetic agents (e.g., epinephrine, albuterol, terbutaline), somatropin, atypical antipsychotics, glucagon, protease inhibitors, and thyroid hormones. Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when Insulin Lispro is co-administered with these drugs.

    Q. Which drugs may increase or decrease the blood glucose lowering effect of Insulin Lispro?

    The glucose-lowering effect of Insulin Lispro may be increased or decreased with co-administered with beta-blockers, clonidine, lithium salts, and alcohol. Pentamidine may cause hypoglycemia, which may sometimes be followed by hyperglycemia. Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring may be required when Insulin Lispro is co-administered with these drugs.

    Q. Which drugs may blunt the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels)?

    The signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia may be blunted when beta-blockers, clonidine, guanethidine, and reserpine are co-administered with Insulin Lispro.

    Q. Is it safe to use Insulin Lispro during pregnancy and lactation (breastfeeding)?

    Data on a large number of exposed pregnancies do not indicate any adverse effect of Insulin Lispro on pregnancy or on the health of the fetus/newborn. Insulin requirements usually fall during the first trimester and increase during the second and third trimesters. Patients with diabetes should be advised to inform their doctor if they are pregnant or are contemplating pregnancy. Careful monitoring of glucose control, as well as general health, is essential in pregnant patients with diabetes. Patients with diabetes who are breastfeeding may require adjustments in insulin dose, diet or both.

    Content on this page was last updated on 11 June, 2018, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)