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    Clobazam

    Information about Clobazam

    Clobazam uses

    Clobazam is used in the treatment of epilepsy and severe anxiety.

    How clobazam works

    Clobazam is a benzodiazepine. It works by increasing the action of a chemical messenger (GABA) which suppresses the abnormal and excessive activity of the nerve cells in the brain.

    Common side effects of clobazam

    Tiredness, Sleepiness, Slurred speech, Fever, Cough, Drooling, Constipation, Difficulty in urination, Aggressive behavior, Insomnia (difficulty in sleeping), Breathing problems
    Content Details
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    Written By
    Dr. Swati Mishra
    Advanced International Certification Course in Diabetes, Cardio-diabetes, Thyroid and Endocrine Disorders, BDS
    author-image
    Reviewed By
    Dr. Lalit Kanodia
    MBA (Hospital Management), MD (Pharmacology)
    Last updated on:
    10 May 2019 | 10:52 AM (IST)
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    Available Medicine for Clobazam

    • ₹49 to ₹295
      Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      6 variant(s)
    • ₹53 to ₹202
      Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
      6 variant(s)
    • ₹80 to ₹285
      Sanofi India Ltd
      3 variant(s)
    • ₹52 to ₹95
      Abbott
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹53 to ₹95
      Alkem Laboratories Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹52 to ₹92
      Micro Labs Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹77 to ₹125
      Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      2 variant(s)
    • ₹51 to ₹120
      Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
      4 variant(s)
    • ₹45 to ₹115
      Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd
      3 variant(s)
    • ₹50 to ₹87
      La Renon Healthcare Pvt Ltd
      2 variant(s)

    Expert advice for Clobazam

    • The addiction / habit-forming potential of this medicine is very high. Take it only as per the dose and duration advised by your doctor
    • It may cause dizziness. Do not drive or do anything that requires mental focus until you know how this medicine affects you.
    • If you have been taking this medicine for a long time, regular monitoring of blood and liver functions may be required.
    • Do not stop taking medication suddenly without talking to your doctor as that may lead to nausea, anxiety, agitation, flu-like symptoms, and muscle pain.
    • If you are taking Clobazam for the treatment of anxiety, it should not be used more than 4 weeks.
    • Clobazam helps treat seizures and severe anxiety.
    • It may be habit-forming with long-term use. Do not take more than prescribed.
    • It may cause dizziness and muscle weakness. Do not drive or do anything that requires mental focus until you know how it affects you.
    • Avoid consuming alcohol as it may increase dizziness and drowsiness.
    • Inform your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to conceive or breastfeeding.
    • Inform your doctor if you notice sores or blisters on your skin, lips, or inside your mouth.
    • Do not stop taking the medication suddenly without talking to your doctor as it may increase seizure frequency.

    Frequently asked questions for Clobazam

    Clobazam

    Q. Is Clobazam/ frisium a benzodiazepine or narcotic or a controlled drug or sedative or addictive?

    Clobazam.s benzodiazepine and controlled drug (addictive), but not a narcotic substance and doesn't cause addiction

    Q. Is Clobazam FDA approved?

    It is approved by FDA

    Q. Is Clobazamthe same as Valium?

    Both of this drugs belongs a to a class called benzodiazepine, but their effects are different

    Q. Is Clobazam safe?

    Clobazam is safe if used at prescribed doses for the prescribed duration as advised by your doctor

    Q. Does Clobazam cause weight gain/ make you sleepy or tired?

    Clobazam may cause weight gain,make you feel sleepy or dizzy, especially when you first start treatment. Contact your doctor if you develop such symptom

    Q. Does Clobazam get you high?

    Yes. But do not use this medicine without prescription as this medicine has potential for abuse with many side effects.

    Content on this page was last updated on 10 May, 2019, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)