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    Amoxycillin

    Information about Amoxycillin

    Amoxycillin uses

    Amoxycillin is used in the treatment of bacterial infections.

    How amoxycillin works

    Amoxycillin is an antibiotic. It kills bacteria by preventing them from forming the bacterial protective covering (cell wall) which is needed for them to survive.

    Common side effects of amoxycillin

    Nausea, Allergic reaction, Rash, Vomiting, Diarrhea
    Content Details
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    Written By
    Dr. Sakshi Sharma
    BDS
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    Reviewed By
    Dr. Ashish Ranjan
    MBA (General management), MD (Clinical Pharmacology)
    Last updated on:
    23 Mar 2019 | 11:41 PM (IST)
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    Available Medicine for Amoxycillin

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      Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
      11 variant(s)
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      Cipla Ltd
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      2 variant(s)

    Expert advice for Amoxycillin

    • Amoxycillin is used to treat infections caused by bacteria.
    • Finish the prescribed course, even if you start to feel better. Stopping it early may make the infection come back and harder to treat.
    • Diarrhea may occur as a side effect. Taking probiotics along with Amoxycillin may help. Talk to your doctor if you notice bloody stools or develop abdominal cramps.
    • Stop taking this medicine and inform your doctor immediately if you develop an itchy rash, swelling of the face, throat or tongue or breathing difficulties while taking it.

    Frequently asked questions for Amoxycillin

    Amoxycillin

    Q. Can Amoxycillin cause allergic reaction?

    Although it is rare but yes, Amoxycillin can cause allergic reaction and is harmful in patients with known allergy to penicillins. Get emergency medical help if you have any of the signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

    Q. Can the use of Amoxycillin cause diarrhea?

    Yes, the use of Amoxycillin can cause diarrhea. It is an antibiotic and it kills the harmful bacteria, however, it also affects the helpful bacteria in your stomach or intestine and causes diarrhea. If diarrhea persists, talk to your doctor about it.

    Q. Can I stop taking Amoxycillin when my symptoms are relieved?

    No, do not stop taking Amoxycillin and finish the full course of treatment even if you feel better. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared.

    Q. How long does Amoxycillin takes to work?

    Usually, Amoxycillin starts working soon after taking it. However, it may take around 2-3 days to make you feel better while taking Amoxycillin.

    Q. Is Amoxycillin safe?

    Amoxycillin is usually considered to be safe when taken as advised by your doctor.

    Q. Does Amoxycillin cause drowsiness?

    No, Amoxycillin has not been reported to cause drowsiness. In case you experience drowsiness while taking Amoxycillin, please consult your doctor.

    Q. What if I don't get better after using Amoxycillin?

    Inform your doctor if you don't feel better after finishing the full course of treatment. Also, inform if your symptoms are getting worse while using this medicine.

    Q. Can the use of Amoxycillin cause failure of contraceptive pills?

    Yes, the use of Amoxycillin can lower the efficacy of birth control pills. Ask your doctor about using some other methods of contraception (such as a condom, diaphragm, spermicide) while you are taking Amoxycillin.

    Content on this page was last updated on 23 March, 2019, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)