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28 Nov 2018 | 03:40 PM (IST)
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Tea tree oil

Tea tree oil
Tea Tree oil is an essential oil with antiseptic property. It has antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. It is used for wound healing and manage skin infection. It is used to control acne, head lice and cold sores. Tea tree oil should always be used after diluting with any carrier oil like coconut oil or olive oil[1][2].

What are the synonyms of Tea tree oil?

Melaleuca alternifolia, Australian Tea tree, Melaleuca Oil, Oil of Melaleuca, Tea Tree

What is the source of Tea tree oil?

Plant Based

Benefits of Tea tree oil

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Acne?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil is beneficial for managing mild to moderate acne. Tea tree oil has antibacterial activity. Application of Tea tree oil helps to inhibit the growth of bacteria causing acne[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Fungal nail infections?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil is beneficial for managing onychomycosis as an adjunct therapy. Tea tree oil has antifungal activity. Application of Tea tree oil helps to inhibit the growth of fungus causing onychomycosis[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Athlete's foot (tinea pedis)?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil is beneficial for managing tinea pedis. Tea tree oil has antifungal activity. Application of Tea tree oil shows clinical improvement in case of tinea pedis[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Dandruff?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil might be beneficial in the management of mild to moderate dandruff[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Fungal infections?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil might be beneficial in the management of vaginal candidiasis. Tea tree oil has antifungal activity. Tea tree oil damages the cell membrane and inhibits the respiration of Candida albicans, thus manages infection[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Sore throat?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree leaf infusion might be beneficial in the management of sore throat due to its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties[3][5].

What are the benefits of Tea tree oil for Fungal infections of vagina?

scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil might be beneficial in the management of trichomoniasis due to its antiprotozoal activity[3][5].

How effective is Tea tree oil?

Likely effective
Acne, Athlete's foot (tinea pedis), Fungal nail infections
Insufficient evidence
Allergic skin conditions, Bacterial infections of the vagina (bacterial vaginosis), Bad odor from mouth, Common cold symptoms, Cough, Dandruff, Dental plaque, Excessive hair growth, Eye / ear infection, Fungal infections, Fungal infections of mouth (Thrush), Fungal infections of vagina, Head lice, Herpes labialis, Inflammation of gums, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, Piles, Ringworm, Scabies, Skin infections, Sore throat, Wound infection

Precautions when using Tea tree oil

Advice from Experts
ayurvedic
Ayurvedic View
Tea tree oil should not be applied in case of burn because it can increase the burning sensation due to its hot potency.
Breastfeeding
ayurvedic
Ayurvedic View
Tea tree oil should be applied to the skin only under medical supervision during lactation.
Children
scientific
Scientific View
Tea tree oil when mixed with lavender oil may cause some hormonal imbalance in young boys who yet not reached puberty. So please consult a doctor before using the Tea tree oil with Lavender oil[3].
Other Interaction
scientific
Scientific View
1. Skin products that contain tea tree oil may enhance the dryness. So please consult a doctor if you have a dry skin before using such products.
2. Tea tree oil may interact with anti-inflammatory, antibiotics, antifungal and anti cancer drugs. So please consult a doctor before consult a doctor before using tea tree if you are taking these medicines.
Pregnancy
ayurvedic
Ayurvedic View
Tea tree oil should be applied to the skin only under medical supervision during pregnancy.
Side Effects
Important
scientific
Scientific View
Rashes[4]

Recommended Dosage of Tea tree oil

  • Tea tree oil Oil - 2-5 drops or as per your requirement.

How to use Tea tree oil

1. Tea tree oil with Honey
a. Take 2-5 drops of Tea tree oil.
b. Add honey to it.
c. Apply evenly on the affected area.
d. Let it sit for 7-10 mins.
e. Wash thoroughly with tap water.
f. Use this remedy 1-3 times a week to control fungal infection.

2. Tea tree oil with Coconut oil
a. Take 2-5 drops of Tea tree oil and mix it with coconut oil.
b. Apply to the affected area of the skin or scalp.
c. Wash it the next morning.
d. Use this remedy 1-2 times a week to manage allergies and dandruff.

3. Tea tree oil with Olive oil
a. Take 2-5 drops of Tea tree oil and mix it with olive oil.
b. Apply to the affected area of the skin.
c. Wash it the next morning.
d. Use this remedy 3-4 times a week to manage eczema and psoriasis.

Frequently asked questions

Q. Is Tea Tree Oil Good for pigmentation?

scientific
Scientific View
Yes, Tea tree oil is good for the skin. It helps control skin pigmentation and improves uneven skin tone[1].

Q. Can you put tea tree oil directly on the skin?

ayurvedic
Ayurvedic View
Tea oil is hot in potency, so you should be careful while applying it on to the face.
Tip:
1. Dilute 2-3 drops of Tea tree oil with 10-15 drops of rose water.
2. Apply it to the skin once or twice a day with a cotton swab.

Q. Can tea tree oil burn your skin?

scientific
Scientific View
Although Tea tree oil is safe to use, excess use might cause skin irritation and redness[3].

References

  1. Sabir S, Zahara K, Tabassum S. Pharmacological attributes and nutritional benefits of tea tree oil.Int J Biosci.2014;5(2):80-91.
  2. Shah G, Baghel US. Melaleuca alternifolia:A review of the medicinal uses, pharmacology and phytochemistry.Int J Chemtech Res.2017;10(7):418-427.
  3. WebMD.Tea Tree Oil: Uses, Side effects, Doses, Interactions [Internet].Atlanta [last updated in 2016].
  4. Ulbricht CE.Natural Standard:Herb and Supplement Guide, An Evidence Based Reference.Elsevier;2010.
Disclaimer
The content is purely informative and educational in nature and should not be construed as medical advice. Please use the content only in consultation with an appropriate certified medical or healthcare professional.