Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

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Overview
Interpretations
FAQ's

Overview of Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

What is Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA?

Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are antibodies produced by the immune system of the body against protein markers found in the nucleus of its own cells. The Antinuclear Antibody Test measures the amount and pattern of antinuclear antibodies in the blood.

Sample Type

The sample type collected for Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA is: Blood

Preparation for Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

  • No special preparation required

Why Get Tested for Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA?

The Antinuclear Antibody Test is performed:

·  To determine the presence of an autoimmune disease like Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

·    To evaluate the possible presence of autoimmune Connective Tissue Disorders (CTDs) other than SLE such as Polymyositis, Scleroderma, Sjögren's syndrome etc.





Understand more about Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

The immune system of the body is responsible for recognition of the body’s own cells and identification of foreign cells like pathogens which are then targeted and destroyed. Autoimmune disorders are conditions where the immune system of the body is unable to recognize certain cells as the body’s own cells and starts an immune response against them which results in their destruction. The recognition of ‘self’ and ‘non-self’ cells is mediated by certain proteins present on the surface of cells or inside them. When the immune system identifies a cell as foreign or ‘non-self’, it produces antibodies against these cells to destroy them. Antibodies produced in an autoimmune disease are called autoantibodies.

Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are autoantibodies that are produced against protein markers present in the nucleus of certain cells of the body. They are produced in a number of autoimmune diseases but are most commonly produced in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE).

The Antinuclear Antibody Test can be performed either by Immunoassay method or Indirect Fluorescent Antibody (IFA) method to detect ANA in blood. Both these tests may be used by some laboratories together: the Immunoassay method to screen for the presence of antinuclear antibodies, and IFA method subsequently to confirm the positive or equivocal Immunoassay results.


What Results of Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA mean?

Interpretations

The appearance of fluorescence is a positive result and indicates the presence of antinuclear antibodies.

The absence of fluorescence is a negative result and indicates the absence of antinuclear antibodies.


Positive results of IFA are expressed in two parts: as titers which are ratios that represent the highest dilution of the blood sample at which antinuclear antibodies were visible, and as the fluorescent pattern seen. Titer value indicates the amount of antinuclear antibodies in the blood, while the pattern of fluorescence indicates different autoimmune diseases.

Some common fluorescence patterns and autoimmune conditions associated with them include:



FLUORESCENCE PATTERN

ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS

Homogenous or diffuse

SLE, drug-induced lupus, and mixed connective tissue disease

Nucleolar

Scleroderma or Polymyositis

Speckled

SLE, Sjögren syndrome, Scleroderma, Polymyositis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and mixed connective tissue disease

Centromere or peripheral

Scleroderma and CREST Syndrome (Calcinosis, Raynaud syndrome, Esophageal dysmotility, Sclerodactyly, Telangiectasia)



Patient Concerns about Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

Frequently Asked Questions about Anti Nuclear Antibody-IFA

Q. How is this test performed?
This test is performed on a blood sample. A syringe with a fine needle attached is used to withdraw blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm generally from the inner side of the elbow area. The doctor, nurse or the phlebotomist will tie an elastic band around your arm which will help the blood vessels to swell with blood and hence makes it easier to withdraw blood. You may be asked to tightly clench your fist. Once the veins are clearly visible, the area is cleaned with an antiseptic solution and then the needle is inserted into the blood vessel to collect the sample. You may feel a tiny pinprick during the procedure. Blood sample once collected is then sent to the laboratory.
Q. Is there any risk associated with this test?
There is no risk associated with the test. However, as this test involves a needle prick to withdraw the blood sample, rarely, a patient may experience increased bleeding, hematoma (blood collection under the skin) formation, bruising or infection at the site of needle prick.
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Sahyadri Speciality Labs is committed to provide the highest quality of Medical Laboratory services. There is a continual effort to ensure that the staff of the lab understands the Quality Policy & all the quality documentation, as well as follows the Quality manual and implements the Quality System Procedures all the time. By employing QMS, the lab strives to achieve the highest standard of service to provide the most reliable results, nearest to the true value and at most competitive rates. The lab is committed to good & ethical professional practices giving highest priority to client’s confidentiality and ensuring the reporting of the test values without any bias or influence. The lab implements the QMS so as to conform to ISO 15189:2007 and NABL 112 with the objective of Reducing reporting errors to the minimum, Minimizing customer complaints, Achieving maximum growth of the lab.
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