Estradiol (E2)
Oestradiol
Overview
Interpretations
FAQ's
Estradiol

Overview of Estradiol

What is Estradiol?

Estradiol is primarily a female sex hormone and is mainly produced by the ovaries. It is also produced by the breasts, adrenal glands and placenta during pregnancy. In males, it is produced in very small amounts by the testes and plays a role in development and growth of bone. In females, it plays an important role in the growth and development of the sex organs which includes: uterus, fallopian tubes, breasts, and vagina. It also plays an important role in regulating the distribution of body fat and to maintain the bone and joint health. The estradiol test measures the levels of estradiol in the blood and is also known as the E2 test.

Sample Type

The sample type collected for Estradiol is: Blood

Preparation for Estradiol

  • No special preparation required

Why Get Tested for Estradiol?

  • To diagnose hypogonadism (production of fewer sex hormones) in females

  • To evaluate the cause of oligomenorrhea (infrequent menstruation) and irregular menstruation in females

  • To evaluate the cause of feminization in males like gynecomastia (enlarged breasts)

  • To evaluate the cause of precocious (early) and delayed puberty in females

  • To evaluate the symptoms of menopause like abnormal vaginal bleeding

  • To monitor follicle development in case of infertility in women

  • To monitor treatment in case of hormone replacement therapy taken by postmenopausal women

  • To evaluate the lack of secondary sexual features, lack of muscle mass, delayed puberty in males


Understand more about Estradiol

Estradiol is a form of estrogen hormone which plays an important role in the function and development of reproductive organs and in the formation of secondary sex characteristics in females. It regulates the menstrual cycle in women along with progesterone. Other functions of estrogen along with progesterone include the growth of breasts and uterus. Estrogen hormone is also found in men. It plays role in growth and metabolism in both males and females. In men, estradiol is produced in testicles while in pre-menopausal women it is produced in ovaries. In postmenopausal women, estradiol is converted to estrone. Estradiol is present in high levels in non-pregnant and pre-menopausal women. Depending upon the age of the women and her reproductive status the values of estradiol varies. It is considered to be one of the good markers as regards to ovarian function.

At birth the levels of estradiol are high but the levels fall within a few days and become minimal during early childhood. As the puberty approaches the levels of estradiol rise. During the menstrual cycle, its levels vary depending upon which phase of the menstrual cycle is ongoing. During menopause, the levels of estradiol fall as the production by ovaries decreases.


What Results of Estradiol mean?

Interpretations

       

High levels of Estradiol may indicate:

  • Puberty before time (precocious puberty) in girls

  • Ovarian Tumors in females

  • Tumors of adrenal glands in men and women

  • Gynecomastia (enlarged breasts) in men

  • Testicular tumors

  • Delayed puberty in males

  • Hyperthyroidism in men and women

  • Cirrhosis in men and women


Low levels of Estradiol may indicate:

  • Hypopituitarism

  • Hypogonadism in females (the abnormal function of ovaries)

  • Following menopause

  • Conditions in which female sexual characteristics are underdeveloped like Turner’s Syndrome


Patient Concerns about Estradiol

Frequently Asked Questions about Estradiol

Q. How is this test performed?
This test is performed on a blood sample. A syringe with a fine needle attached is used to withdraw blood sample from a blood vessel in your arm generally from the inner side of the elbow area. The doctor, nurse or the phlebotomist will tie an elastic band around your arm which will help the blood vessels to swell with blood and hence makes it easier to withdraw blood. You may be asked to tightly clench your fist. Once the veins are clearly visible, the area is cleaned with an antiseptic solution and then the needle is inserted into the blood vessel to collect the sample. You may feel a tiny pinprick during the procedure. Blood sample once collected is then sent to the laboratory.
Q. Is there any risk associated with this test?
There is no risk associated with the test. However, as this test involves a needle prick to withdraw the blood sample, rarely, a patient may experience increased bleeding, hematoma (blood collection under the skin) formation, bruising or infection at the site of needle prick.
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