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TRESIBA 100 IU DISPOSABLE PEN

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MRP: Rs. 1850 for 1 packet(s) (3 ML disposable pen each)
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Composition for TRESIBA

Insulin Degludec(100 iu)

food interaction for TRESIBA

alcohol interaction for TRESIBA

pregnancy interaction for TRESIBA

lactation interaction for TRESIBA

food
alcohol
pregnancy
lactation
It can be taken with or without food, but it is better to take Tresiba 100 iu disposable pen at a fixed time.
Taking Insulin Degludec with alcohol may affect blood glucose levels in patients with diabetes.
UNSAFE
Tresiba 100 iu disposable pen may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
WEIGH RISKS VS. BENEFITS
Tresiba 100 iu disposable pen is probably safe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
SAFE

SALT INFORMATION for TRESIBA

Insulin Degludec(100 iu)

Uses

Tresiba 100 iu disposable pen is used in the treatment of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

How it works

Tresiba 100 iu disposable pen replaces the insulin that the body would normally make. Insulin is critical for promoting the use and storage of all the major nutrients : glucose, fats and proteins.

Common side effects

Application site itching, Bone-marrow suppression, Increase in body weight, Injection site pain, Injection site redness, Injection site swelling

Common Dosage for TRESIBA 100 IU DISPOSABLE PEN

Patients taking TRESIBA 100 IU DISPOSABLE PEN

  • 92%
    Once A Day
  • 3%
    Twice A Day
  • 2%
    Thrice A week
  • 1%
    Thrice A Day
  • 1%
    Twice A Week

SUBSTITUTES for TRESIBA

No substitutes found

Top Diabetologists

  • Dr. Atul Luthra
    MBBS, MD, DNB
    4.8
  • Dr. Raman Abhi
    MBBS, MD
    4.5
  • Dr. Neelima Mishra
    MBBS, MD
    4.4
  • Dr. Rajesh Kumar
    MBBS, MD, Diploma, CCT
    4.3
  • Dr. Sanjay Verma
    MBBS, MD
    4.1

Expert advice for TRESIBA

  • Avoid consuming alcohol as it may increase the chance of severe low blood sugar. 
  • Notify your doctor if you have any signs of troubled-breathing or rashes (severe and life-threatening allergy).
     
     
     
  • Type 2 diabetes can be controlled with a proper diet alone or a diet along with exercise. Planned diet and exercising are always important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking antidiabetic medicines. 
  • Low blood sugar is life-threatening. Low blood sugar may occur due to:
    • Delay or missing a scheduled meal or snacks. 
    • Exercising more than usual. 
    • Drinking a significant amount of alcohol.
    • Using too much insulin.
    • Sickness (vomiting or diarrhea).
  • The main symptoms (alarming signs) of low blood sugar are fast heartbeat, sweating, cool pale skin, feeling shaky, confusion or irritability, headache, nausea, and nightmares. Make sure that you have access to quick-acting sugar sources that treat low blood sugar. Consuming some form of quick-acting sugars immediately after the appearance of the symptoms will prevent the low blood sugar levels from worsening. 

Frequently asked questions for TRESIBA

Insulin Degludec

Q.What is insulin degludec?
Insulin degludec is long-acting basal insulin

Q.How does insulin degludec work?
Insulin degludec binds (attaches) to the human insulin receptor and performs effects actions same as human insulin. It promotes the uptake and utilization of sugar (glucose) in the body. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. After the injection of insulin degludec multi-hexamers of insulin degludec are formed which act as store house (depots) from which small amounts of insulin degludec are continuously.

What our users are saying about TRESIBA 100 IU DISPOSABLE PEN

How effective is this medicine?

Effective
62%
Moderately effective
19%
Can't say
19%

Do you find this medicine expensive?

Yes
86%
No
14%

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Content on this page was last updated on 15 November, 2016, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)