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Composition for TOBICA


food interaction for TOBICA

alcohol interaction for TOBICA

pregnancy interaction for TOBICA

lactation interaction for TOBICA

There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.




Tobica eye drops is used as an injection for treating bacterial infections of the skin, heart, stomach, brain, spinal cord, lungs, and urinary tract (bladder and kidneys). It is also used in the treatment of cystic fibrosis. In the form of eye-drops, it can be used to treat eye infections.

How it works

Tobica eye drops is an aminoglycoside antibiotic produced by bacteria Streptomyces tenebrarius. It acts by blocking protein synthesis in bacterial cell, causing disruption of the cell envelope and eventual cell death.

Common side effects

Sore throat, Chest pain, Loss of appetite, Headache, Noisy breathing, Tongue ulcer, Hoarseness of voice, Increased sputum production, Liver toxicity, Oral fungal infection, Coughing up blood, Dizziness, Dry eye, Thoracic pain, Rash, Shortness of breath, Increased saliva production, Gastric pain, Mouth ulcer, Nausea, Fungal infection, Chest tightness, Weakness, Cough, Hearing loss, Ringing in ear


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Expert advice for TOBICA

  • Do not use tobramycin if you are allergic to it or any other component in the formulation.
  • Driving and using machinery should be avoided in cases where tobramycin usage causes dizziness or eye drops cause blurring of vision.
  • Do not mix or dilute your tobramycin with any other medicine in your nebulizer.
  • If you are taking several different treatments for cystic fibrosis, you should take them in the following order: bronchodilator (e.g. salbutamol), then chest physiotherapy, followed by inhaled medicines, and then tobramycin.
  • Do not use contact lenses when on treatment with tobramycin eye drops.
  • If you are using more than one eye drop, keep a gap of at least 5-10 minutes between two different eye drops.
  • Doctor’s advice should be considered in case of patients with following history of disease conditions: neuromuscular disorders such as parkinsonism, myasthenia gravis (characterized by movement disorders and/or muscle weakness); coughing up blood in your sputum; kidney problem.
  • Inform your doctor if you have ever experienced in the past: ringing in ears, any other problems with hearing, dizziness while taking tobramycin.

Frequently asked questions for TOBICA


Q. Is tobramycin a sulfa drug or penicillin antibiotic?
No. Tobramycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic used to treat Pseudomonas infections and other serious infections in patients (6 years and older) with cystic fibrosis.
Q. Does tobramycin treat styes, Pseudomonas, pink eye, staphylococcus and methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)?
Tobramycin/dexamethasone combination can be used to cure pink eye and styes, which are superficial eye and eyelid infections. Tobramycin treats Pseudomonas infections however it is not drug of choice in the treatment of staphylococcus or MRSA.
Q. Is tobramycin safe for infants?
No. Due to high propensity for kidney and internal ear damage, tobramycin shouldn’t be given to infants.
Q. Is tobramycin over the counter?
No. Tobramycin belongs to schedule H and can be obtained only on production of valid prescription.
Q. Is tobramycin the same as ofloxacin?
No. Tobramycin and Ofloxacin belong to different class of antibiotics, and are used to treat different sets of infections.


Content on this page was last updated on 10 April, 2015, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)