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Composition for FLIXONASE

Fluticasone Topical(0.05%)

food interaction for FLIXONASE

alcohol interaction for FLIXONASE

pregnancy interaction for FLIXONASE

lactation interaction for FLIXONASE

It can be taken with or without food, but it is better to take Flixonase 0.05% nasal spray at a fixed time.
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Flixonase 0.05% nasal spray may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Either animal studies have shown adverse effect on fetus and there are no human studies or studies in human and animals are not available. It should be given only if potential benefits justifies risk to the fetus. Please consult your doctor.
Flixonase 0.05% nasal spray is probably safe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.


Fluticasone Topical(0.05%)


Flixonase 0.05% nasal spray is used to control symptoms of allergic and non-allergic rhinitis (inflammation of nose, throat or chest), to treat stuffy, runny or itchy nose, sneezing, nasal congestion, watery, itchy or red eyes, nasal polyps (abnormal growth of tissue) or other nasal obstructions, asthma. It is also used to treat skin problems like atopic dermatitis (patches of itchy, rough and inflamed skin with blisters), nummular dermatitis (itchy, coin-shaped spots or patches on skin), prurigo nodularis (itchy skin nodules), psoriasis (red and itchy scales on skin), neurodermatitis  (thick and leathery skin due to excessive itching and scratching), seborrhoeic dermatitis (scaly patches, red skin causing dandruff), contact dermatitis (red, itchy, inflamed skin caused due to contact with allergens), prickly heat or insect bites, discoid lupus erythematosus (inflamed red bumps with  scaling and a crusty appearance on the skin) and in erythroderma (excessive redness of skin). 

How it works

Fluticasone belongs to a class of medications called as glucocorticoids/steroids. It prevents the release of the chemicals (prostaglandins, leukotrienes) in the body that cause inflammation and allergies.

Common side effects

Fever, Chest tightness, Cough, Altered sense of smell, Altered taste, Headache, Itching, Nose bleed, Nasal congestion, Nasal dryness, Nasal irritation, Sneezing, Sore throat, Throat irritation, White spots in the mouth, Vomiting, Stomach upset

Common Dosage

Patients taking this medicines

  • 46%
    Two Times A Day
  • 46%
    One Time A Day
  • 5%
    Three Times A Day
  • 2%
    Once A Week
  • 1%
    Four Times A Day


1 Substitutes
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    (15 ML nasal spray in packet)
    Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
    Rs. 15.80/ML of nasal spray
    Rs. 237
    pay 350% more per ML of nasal spray

Top General Physicians

  • Dr. Anuj Pall
    MBBS, MD, PhD, Certification
  • Dr. Atula Gupta
    MBBS, MD
  • Dr. Sangeeta Verma
  • Dr. Avnish Sharma
    MBBS, Diploma, Fellowship
  • Dr. Shuchi Singla
    MBBS, MD

Expert advice for FLIXONASE

  • Consult your doctor if you have an infection in the nasal passage or sinus.
  • Inform your doctor if you have tuberculosis, other chest or lung infection, breathing problem, cold, liver disease or thin or brittle bones before using the medicine.
  • Avoid use of fluticasone topical preparation on areas where you have itchiness, redness, rashes, infection or acne on the skin.
  • Inform your doctor if you have breathing problems or tightness in the chest even after taking the medicine.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. 
  • Do not use if you are allergic to fluticasone or any of its ingredients.
  • Do not use if you have liver disease, bacterial or fungal infections or low bone mineral density.
  • Do not use if you are taking anti-HIV drugs like ritonavir or anti-fungal drugs like ketoconazole.
  • Do not use if you have untreated cutaneous infections, rosacea, acne vulgaris, perioral dermatitis (a condition characterized by is a facial rash on the face causing bumps to develop round the mouth), perianal and genital pruritus, pruritus without inflammation, dermatoses in infants under three months of age, including dermatitis and nappy rash.

Frequently asked questions for FLIXONASE

Fluticasone Topical

Q. Is fluticasone an antibiotic/steroid/anti-histaminic/anti-cholinergic drug?
Fluticasone is a steroid but not an antibiotic/anti-histaminic/anti-cholinergic/decongestant drug. It is used to treat nasal congestion (decongestant) and other symptoms caused by allergies or conditions like asthma.

Q. Does it contain sulfa?
 It does not contain sulfa.
Q. Is Fluticasone the same as Nasonex/Flonase? 
Fluticasone is also available in the branded form as Flonase nasal spray. However, Nasonex consists of another drug called Mometasone also used for treating nasal allergies. 
Q. Is Fluticasone safe?
Yes. Fluticasone is relatively safe if used as recommended. In case of any side-effects, consult your doctor.

Q. Is it used in infants?
 It is used for skin allergies in children or infants. Please consult your doctor before use.
Q. What is used for?
Fluticasone (nasal drop, nasal spray) is used to treat nasal inflammation such as coughing, wheezing, blocked nose, runny nose. It is also used as topical cream to treat various skin allergies and infections.

Q. Is fluticasone used for cold?
 It is not used for common cold.
Q. Does fluticasone propionate cause drowsiness/wakefulness?
Fluticasone may cause drowsiness or wakefulness. If you experience any such symptoms, please consult your doctor.
Q. Is fluticasone addictive?
No. Fluticasone is not an addictive or a controlled/banned substance.
Q. Does fluticasone cause nose bleeds?
Yes. The most common and expected side-effect of fluticasone nasal spray/inhaler is nose bleeding. If your bleeding does not stop, please consult your doctor.
Q. Can I take fluticasone if I have high blood pressure?
It is advisable to consult your doctor before taking fluticasone if you have high blood pressure.


Content on this page was last updated on 23 August, 2016, by Dr. Varun Gupta (MD Pharmacology)